Posts Tagged ‘Coen Brothers’

Screen Shot 2016-02-18 at 12.50.06Kicking off the 2016 edition of Glasgow Film Festival last night was The Coen Brother’s new romp Hail, Caesar! their ode to the Studio System era of 50s Hollywood. As to be expected with the Coens, they deal with their subject with an equal amount of love and cynicism, looking at the “Golden Era” of their craft with a healthy dose of post-modern irony.

As is now customary with the Coens, the brothers direct a star-studded ensemble cast in their lighthearted love-letter to a bygone era, excellently re-creating the studio lots of Capitol Pictures. Binding the multiple simultaneous projects together is Eddie Mannix (Josh Brolin) the studio’s fixer who solves the various problems of the studio’s cast and crew, as well as batting away questions from scoop-hungry twin sister journalists, both played by Tilda Swinton.

Nearing the climax of the studio’s production of their “premier picture Hail, Caesar!” however, central star Baird Whitlock (George Clooney) disappears on an assumed “1 or 2-day bender”; though the party line is that he has a “high-ankle sprain”. In actual fact, Whitlock has been kidnapped, in a scheme actualised by a couple of extras on the set of the film, and taken to a strange place where nothing is quite as it seems.

Although they set the film up a potential road-caper, The Coens don’t, in fact, focus merely on Whitlock’s disappearance, but also the studio’s “the show must go on” attitude, in spite of adversity due to a tight schedule and budget. While Mannix is aware of the problem and its severe nature, it doesn’t suddenly jump to the top of his priorities list in his daily roles, as he must keep various other stars and directors happy with their own problems, while also considering a highly lucrative and much more comfortable job offer of his own.

This is when the film is at its best, showing the rather manic Studio System as it churns out its latest epic, western, drama and musical, all the while needing a cool pair of hands at the centre of it all (Mannix) who – while clearly respected within the studio – has no elevated status, which is reserved for the “key talent”. While Mannix doesn’t seem to mind this, he does battle his own personal demons and Catholic guilt, with a secret smoking habit and a tempting job offer. Despite this he is a seemingly decent man who genuinely loves and respects his family.

Brolin plays the, on the face of it, controlled Mannix with aplomb, and is excellent as lynchpin for the entire picture. While Clooney and other star cameo turns (Johannsson, Tatum, McDormand, Swinton) are all highly enjoyable, the film simply wouldn’t have a leg to stand on without Brolin.

The trouble is that the film as a whole fails to really capitalise on the wealth of talent on offer. While it is highly entertaining, there is nothing here that really sticks with you for much longer than the screen-time. There is plenty of humour and enjoyment to be found in the Coen’s faithful recreating of 1950s Hollywood, including an exaggerated nod to the blacklist and “Communist threat” of the era – playing at times like a twisted version of the recent biopic Trumbo – yet the film doesn’t dig much further than that.

While this isn’t necessarily a problem given the Coens have largely made a career out of films where nothing really happens, or works, it equally is that expectation which befalls Hail, Caesar!. Any fans of the brothers’ work can find various re-treadings of ideas they’ve done before and much more successfully.

For instance, the setting and ideas on display here are also in the masterful Barton Fink, the comedic road movie caper in The Big Lebowski, the kidnapping trope in Fargo, the theological considerations of A Serious Man. These films explored their central ideas very successfully and while Hail, Caesar! is clearly more light-hearted fare, one can’t help but feel that we’ve been here before and in more entertaining circumstances.

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Sicilian American actor Ben Gazzara, famed for his work with John Cassavetes died on Friday of pancreatic cancer, aged 81. Gazzara’s career spanned seven decades and his impact as an actor was felt through generations of American filmmaking. Beginning his career on Broadway in the 1950’s, notably working with Elia Kazan on Tennessee William’s Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Gazzara went on to study at the Actors Studio before truly making an impression in the films of John Cassavetes. Working alongside Gena Rowlands and Peter Falk, Gazzara featured in three Cassavetes films: Husbands (1970), The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976) and Opening Night (1977). In 1979 Gazzara starred as a pimp in Peter Bogdanovich’s Saint Jack; the production won the critics prize at the Venice Film Festival, the first film to win it in seven years at the time. Later in his career Gazzara’s impression on the younger generation of American filmmakers became clear, working with Vincent Gallo, the Coen Brothers, Todd Solondz and Spike Lee in Buffalo ’66 (1998), The Big Lebowski (1998), Happiness (1998) and Summer of Sam (1998).

THE KILLING OF A CHINESE BOOKIE (DIR. JOHN CASSAVETTES, 1976)

SAINT JACK (DIR. PETER BOGDANOVICH, 1979)

BUFFALO ’66 (DIR. VINCENT GALLO, 1998)

THE BIG LEBOWSKI (DIR. JOEL & ETHAN COEN, 1998)

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