Posts Tagged ‘Nebraska’

1) THE GREAT BEAUTY (DIR. PAULO SORRENTINO, ITALY)

rsz_18nejA Federico Fellini film for the Bunga Bunga generation, Sorrentino returns to form with perhaps his greatest film yet. Toni Servillo plays an ageing playboy journalist who begins to tire of the endless parties and excess in his beloved Rome. The film mixes high art and low trash to an exhilarating degree, swooping from sober existentialism to scandalous hedonism at the directors whim. While the parties are filmed with an inventive, restless vigour, it’s Servillo’s hangdog lead that lingers in the memory.

2) NEBRASKA (DIR. ALEXANDER PAYNE, USA)

rsz_nebraska3This austere, melancholic road movie follows Woody, an alcoholic pensioner and his put upon son as they travel across the American highways to cash in a bogus junk mail prize for 1 million dollars. It’s a superbly concise and effective set up to explore the American dream and the way it lures in its everyday victims with visions of wild riches. Shot in beautiful black and white, director Payne makes great use of both the endless plains and the weary faces. It would be a bleak watch if it didn’t contain a redeeming mix of wry and slapstick humour.

3) POST TENEBRAS LUX (DIR. CARLOS REYGADAS, MEXICO)

This is Mexican maverick Carlos Reygadas going for broke here. Wildly adventurous, visually inventive and probably quite infuriating for large swathes of the audience, I loved every beguiling second of it. But that doesn’t necessarily mean I could tell you what it’s about. The story, of which there is little, follows a privileged Mexican family living on the outskirts of an impoverished and remote rural town. Oppressed by a tyrannical father, the film is possibly a semi-autobiographical account of Reygadas’ own life. Surreal highlights include a glowing animated devil figure and steamy sauna scenes.

4) FRANCES HA (DIR. NOAH BAUMBACH, USA)

A delightful and charming rites of passage comedy showcasing Greta Garwig’s inimitable charisma. She plays a naive and childlike New Yorker struggling to hold onto her dreams of being a dancer. Ditched by her best friend and unwilling to commit to a romantic relationship, Frances is forced to seek out on her own. As a privileged and somewhat spoilt protagonist, the film would fall apart if it wasn’t for Frances’ infectious goofiness and will to succeed. Baumbach again succeeds at making us care about characters who aren’t always perfect human beings.

5) HORS SATAN (DIR. BRUNO DUMONT, FRANCE)

Imagine a more mystical Michael Haneke and you might be halfway towards the films of Bruno Dumont. This strange, unsettling film follows ‘The Guy’, a mystical, messianic figure, and ‘The Girl’, a local gothic girl who together roam the windswept coastline of Northern France. ‘The Guy’ has the power to kill and the power to heal, with a strange ability to save people by having sex with them. An absurd idea on paper, but Dumont makes it work. A beguiling mix of realism and surrealism, Dumont orchestrates both the visual and aural brutality of the desolate landscape to startling effect.

6) LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON (DIR. HIROKAZU KOREEDA, JAPAN)

Carrying on from his previous film I Wish, director Koreeda concocts another incisive and moving portrait of modern Japanese families. Ryota is a workaholic in the city who has little time for his son Keita, and when Ryota learns that Keita might be the result of a mix up at birth, he has to decide whether blood ties or love ties matter the most to him. The story contrasts Ryota’s uptight, glossy family with their biological son Ryusei’s scatty family living in the country to great effect. A moving and humane exploration of what it means to be a parent.

7) THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES (DIR. DEREK CIANFRANCE, USA)

A film which divided critics and audiences alike, Cianfrance’s ‘difficult second album’ is an ambitious, sprawling crime drama that motors through three generations. Ryan Gosling’s turn as a speedy heist merchant steals the show in the opening act, yet it’s Bradley Cooper’s angsty performance that lends weight to the whole film. The final section is a little weak but overall the film is a joy to watch. Cianfrance combines stylish retro thrills with an inventive structure and meaty drama.

8) TO THE WONDER (DIR. TERRENCE MALICK, USA)

As a self confessed Malick-nerd this arrives at a surprisingly lowly position, and I would suggest it is his weakest film in his ouevre so far. The film is a frustrating, challenging piece of work with some enigmatic, introspective performances…and yet there is something niggling away, burrowing beneath your skin as you watch it. A muted Ben Affleck plays a desolate man torn between Olga Kurylenko, a vivacious Parisian, and Rachel McAdams, a sweet local. The themes and drama are less pronounced that in his previous films and that is often infuriating, yet if I was to pick one of these films to have staying power then it might just be this one.

9) BULLHEAD (DIR. MICHAEL R. ROSKAM, BELGIUM)

This was a criminally under-seen thriller that came out earlier in the year. Matthias Schoenaerts, a hulking presence, plays a simmering Cattle farmer in rural Belgium who helps illegally inject steroids into the animals. When a new business venture with foreign investors goes suitably awry, Schoenaerts has to fight to save the business and his own life. Coming on the heels of moody, character driven French thrillers like A Prophet and A Beat That My Heart Skipped, newcomer Roskam delivers a punchy crime drama like Scorsese used to make in his heyday.

10) SPRING BREAKERS (DIR. HARMONY KORINE, USA)

Harmony Korine now seems like the Peter Pan of the US underground cinema, constantly ferreting away trying to find the latest movements in youth culture. With Spring Breakers he has hit upon the Girls Gone Wild franchise and turned it into something surreal and often beautiful. In a master stroke of casting he nabbed a couple of Disney starlets for the leads, giving the film both considerable marketable clout and blurring the lines between reality and fiction. The lean story is essentially a bunch of bollocks; four teenagers go on a Cancun-style orgy of excess and violence. It is Korine’s own warped, poetic take on proceedings that make it something special.

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Lazy as a Sunday morning, Alexander Payne‘s new film drifts elegantly into your nearest cinema. Payne has established himself as the most able salesman of melancholic Americana of his generation. No one has cut to the wounded heart of middle America quite like Alexander Payne has. Election, one of his earlier films, I would count as one of the most depressing films I have seen. It wasn’t as dramatically bleak as a Haneke or Tarr; instead there was something unnervingly banal about the depiction of small town frustrations. They were all too believable, and Payne has carved out a substantial career mixing belly laughs and existential anxieties.

Nebraska, his latest winner, is another road movie following in the tracks of Sideways and About Schmidt. The American road movie often deals with outsiders, people on the periphery and unable to function in normal society. So they set out on the road, where there are no boundaries or people telling them what to do. Woody (Bruce Dern) is perhaps another of these outsiders, a bedraggled husband and father losing his mind in Montana. A devoted drinker, he is constantly nagged at by his sharp tongued wife Kate (June Squibb) and his considerate son David (Will Forte).

We first discover him shuffling along the highway, lost in his own world, much like the iconic Travis in Paris, Texas, another victim of the American Dream. David soon uncovers his father’s plot to travel across the country to cash in a winning lottery ticket. Except the million dollar ticket is merely a junk mail con. Unable to convince his father of the bogus prize, David decides to humour his ailing father by driving across the country with him. It is a simple and perfect set up to explore the American Dream; the outlandish visions of riches, the broken family and the open road.

For the first time Payne is shooting in digital black and white. It looks beautiful, by far his most visually arresting film. Choosing to shoot in monochrome is an interesting decision; I always feel it’s a bit like a rockstar taking up the acoustic guitar in that they feel it has more of a ‘purity’ to it in its starkness. The score by Mark Orton verges on being too twee but pulls it back from the brink, resulting in a quietly melancholic accompaniment.

Like his other work, Payne moves between cruder slapstick set pieces, such as a barnyard theft, and more subtle deadpan moments. In interviews the director has often offered his admiration for the silent comedies of the 20’s and you can see the influence there if you look closely enough. All of the characters and scenes are grounded in reality though; one scene that particularly ticked me was a group of old men discussing car journey lengths. As someone who has had to listen to various family members eagerly discuss which is the best route and how long it would take, this observation rang completely true.

As usual the acting is excellent, with Dern and Squibb stealing the show. Dern, who once made a career out of playing jerks in the 70’s, now looks frail and lost. With his fluffy white hair dancing over his head and his clothes drowning around him, he is a world away from the coiffured Hollywood stars we see on screen. He doesn’t emote, he barks. There is no sentimentality here. June Squibb, a relative unknown, is joyously sarky as his overbearing wife and yet we see the humanity ebbing from her by the closing credits.

There are a few minor flaws. For a film which is often so understated and subtle, there are a few on the nose moments of writing that jar with the rest of the film. In screenwriting the first and second drafts usually have these moments where the character says exactly how they are feeling, a clumsy way of the writer exploring the character’s wants and needs. But here they feel like they haven’t been fine-tuned. These, however, are small quibbles in an elegiac, funny, moving film.

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